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Porsche Classic

The Porsche 911

In September 1963, Porsche debuted the 901, the successor to the popular 356. A total of 82 cars were built between September and November of 1964 when Porsche presented the 901 at the 1964 Paris Auto Salon. French carmaker Peugeot objected to Porsche using a three-digit number with the middle digit “0” and asserted ownership of the naming rights in many key markets. Porsche simply replaced the 0 with a 1 and named their car the 911. The car was designed to be larger, more powerful and more comfortable than the 356 that it replaced. The first 911s reached American shores in February of 1965, and they retailed for $6,500. The first generation featured a 128hp, air-cooled, flat-6 engine that displaced 1991cc.   This powerplant was significantly larger and more powerful than the 356’s 1582cc flat-4. The styling was significantly influenced by Ferdinand “Butzi” Porsche, son of Ferdinand “Ferry” Porsche. In 1966, Porsche introduced a more powerful version called the 911S, which made a much higher 158hp.

1973 Porsche 911E

The 1973 model year 911 received a new, larger 2341cc motor. This motor is universally known at the ‘2.4L’ despite the fact that its displacement is closer to 2.3 liters. The 911E and 911S both utilized Bosch mechanical fuel injection. Due to the power and torque increase from the larger motor, the 2.4L cars received a new stronger transmission known as the 915. The 915 transmission was developed from the transmission in the Porsche 908 racecar.

Porsches are in their element on the road or the track, not safely tucked away in a garage.  The 911E featured in the exhibit is a true driver’s car.  It is thoroughly enjoyed and driven quite frequently.  The car is completely original, the body has never seen wax and the interior is immaculate. The car is in excellent condition although it has a few small imperfections.  These imperfections only add to the unique character of the vehicle and underline that this Porsche is being used for its intended purpose: driving.

1957 Porsche 356A Speedster

  • 1582cc horizontally-opposed air-cooled four-cylinder
  • Four-speed manual gearbox
  • 71hp @ 4500rpm, 81lb-ft @ 2800rpm
  • Speedster body by Reutter

The 356 Speedster helped cement Porsche’s place in the North American market. Its low price of only $3000 and low-slung profile made it wildly popular to sports car enthusiast. The cars featured minimal creature comforts but had incredible handling characteristics. Steve McQueen, “The King of Cool” owned a Porsche Speedster. The 356A (T2) Speedster was built from September of 1957 to August of 1958. The T2 is considered by many to be the most beautiful and desirable example. There were no substantial changes to the T2 engine, although there were some minor improvements. The external door handle on the T2 features a more rounded profile when compared to the square profile found on the Pre-A and T1 handles. This 1957 356A Speedster has a 1582cc horizontally opposed air-cooled 4-cylinder which produces around 60hp.

1989 Porsche Speedster

  • 3165cc SOHC horizontally opposed six-cylinder
  • Five-speed manual gearbox
  • 231hp @ 5900rpm, 195lb-ft @ 4800rpm
  • Only 1400 original miles

The 356 Speedster helped cement Porsche’s place in the North American market.  Its low price of only $3000 and low-slung profile made it wildly popular to sports car enthusiast.  The cars featured minimal creature comforts but had incredible handling characteristics.  Steve McQueen, “The King of Cool” owned a Porsche Speedster.  The 356A (T2) Speedster was built from September of 1957 to August of 1958.  The T2 is considered by many to be the most beautiful and desirable example.  There were no substantial changes to the T2 engine, although there were some minor improvements.  The external door handle on the T2 features a more rounded profile when compared to the square profile found on the Pre-A and T1 handles.  This 1957 356A Speedster has a 1582cc horizontally opposed air-cooled 4-cylinder which produces around 60hp.  The example featured in the gallery underwent an extensive cosmetic and mechanical restoration from 1998 to 2003.  This vehicle was purchased, by the current owner, at a Bonham auction held at the Larz Anderson Auto Museum in 2004 and has since been featured in several museum exhibits.  It is truly an excellent example of the marque.