COMMUNITY SPEAKERS SERIES

L arz and Isabel Anderson made various provisions to ensure that their beautiful estate in Brookline would be a resource and benefit to the surrounding community. In addition to hosting dignitaries, the Andersons used their home as a cultural center, hosting plays for children of the town, dog shows, birthday parties, charity functions, and ice skating on the pond in the winter, as well as playing host to informal lawn gatherings of likeminded early automobile enthusiasts, at the dawn of the motor age. Decades after their passing, the Larz Anderson Auto Museum continues the Anderson’s enduring legacy by opening our doors to the public for our Community History Speakers Series. Designed to create a community-wide conversation about history in our area, the topics range from architecture, textiles, American history in Brookline, and of course, the Andersons themselves. Doors open at 6:30pm | Presentation at 7:00pm for all events.

UPCOMING EVENTS

Though these are free community events,
online registration in advance guarantees your admittance.
Make sure to reserve your ticket before
it’s sold out!

Doors open at 6:30pm | Presentation Starts at 7:00pm
for all events unless stated.

 
SEP19

A History of Howard Johnson's

How a Massachusetts Soda Fountain Became an American Icon
Thursday, September 19, 2019
Doors open at 6:30pm | Presentation Starts at 7:00pm
 

Howard Johnson created an orange-roofed empire of ice cream stands and restaurants that stretched from Maine to Florida and all the way to the West Coast. Popularly known as the "Father of the Franchise Industry," Johnson delivered good food and prices that brought appreciative customers back for more. The attractive white Colonial Revival restaurants, with eye-catching porcelain tile roofs, illuminated cupolas and sea blue shutters, were described in Reader's Digest in 1949 as the epitome of "eating places that look like New England town meeting houses dressed up for Sunday." Join us as Boston historian and author Anthony M. Sammarco recounts how Howard Johnson introduced twenty-eight flavors of ice cream, the "Tendersweet" clam strips, grilled frankforts and a menu of delicious and traditional foods that families eagerly enjoyed when they traveled.

 
Sing a song of Ice Cream, flavors twenty-eight
Simple Simon sampled some, says, “They all are great!”
From A to Z the flavor’s fine – this pineapple is prime!
I’ve only got to Number Ten – but give a fellow time!
 

Sammarco has taught at The Urban College of Boston since 1997, where his courses led to him being named Educator of the Year. He also teaches Boston History at the Boston University Metropolitan College. He has received the Bulfinch Award from the Doric Dames of the Massachusetts State House and the Washington Medal from Freedom Foundation and a lifetime achievement from the Victorian Society and the Gibson House Museum and was named Dorchester town historian by Raymond L. Flynn, mayor of Boston, for his work in history. He was elected a Fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society, is a member of the Boston Author's Club, a proprietor of the Boston Athenaeum and the St. Botolph Club in Boston.

This is a free community event. Suggested donation of $10.
Doors open at 6:30pm | Presentation at 7:00pm


Books will be available for purchase via cash or check.
Every dollar received for these presentations helps to defray the cost of providing outstanding community programing. Please support the Larz Anderson Auto Museum as we fulfill our mission to serve and educate.

 
nov19

Molasses: From the Slave Trade to the Great Flood

Back by popular demand and with a new riveting topic – Boston Historian Anthony M. Sammarco!
Tuesday, November 19, 2019
Doors open at 6:30pm | Presentation Starts at 7:00pm
 

Molasses is described as a sweet, syrupy byproduct made during the extraction of sugars from sugarcane. Molasses has a rich history in the Caribbean where sugarcane is cultivated and was a popular sweetener throughout the United States in the early 20th century. Massachusetts has an integral connection as it was part of the Triangle Trade, the 18th century world economy. Rum from New England was traded in Africa for slaves, which were brought to the West Indies and the Caribbean where they cultivated sugar cane. The sugar cane was later refined into molasses, which was shipped to New England and often used in the distillation of rum. This lecture will explore the Isaac Royall Family of Medford and the Lawrence Rum Distillery on Ship Avenue (now Riverside Avenue). In his lecture on “Molasses,” Anthony Sammarco traces it from the 18th century through the tea-totalism and abolitionist causes of the 19th century to the Great Molasses Flood of 1919, which became an integral part of the North End of Boston’s history.

Sammarco has taught at The Urban College of Boston since 1997, where his courses led to him being named Educator of the Year. He also teaches Boston History at the Boston University Metropolitan College. He has received the Bulfinch Award from the Doric Dames of the Massachusetts State House and the Washington Medal from Freedom Foundation and a lifetime achievement from the Victorian Society and the Gibson House Museum and was named Dorchester town historian by Raymond L. Flynn, mayor of Boston, for his work in history. He was elected a Fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society, is a member of the Boston Author's Club, a proprietor of the Boston Athenaeum and the St. Botolph Club in Boston.

This is a free community event. Suggested donation of $10.
Doors open at 6:30pm | Presentation at 7:00pm


Books will be available for purchase via cash or check.
Every dollar received for these presentations helps to defray the cost of providing outstanding community programing. Please support the Larz Anderson Auto Museum as we fulfill our mission to serve and educate.

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