COMMUNITY SPEAKERS SERIES

L arz and Isabel Anderson made various provisions to ensure that their beautiful estate in Brookline would be a resource and benefit to the surrounding community. In addition to hosting dignitaries, the Andersons used their home as a cultural center, hosting plays for children of the town, dog shows, birthday parties, charity functions, and ice skating on the pond in the winter, as well as playing host to informal lawn gatherings of likeminded early automobile enthusiasts, at the dawn of the motor age. Decades after their passing, the Larz Anderson Auto Museum continues the Anderson’s enduring legacy by opening our doors to the public for our Community History Speakers Series. Designed to create a community-wide conversation about history in our area, the topics range from architecture, textiles, American history in Brookline, and of course, the Andersons themselves.

 
 

From Kenmore Square to Packard’s Corner, Commonwealth Avenue in Boston and Brookline was lined with grand auto showrooms for much of the 20th century. What has now been repurposed as Boston University buildings, grocery stores, restaurants, bars, and nightclubs, was once a thriving stretch of road dedicated to the automobile, with more than a mile of dealerships, repair shops, and aftermarket accessory purveyors. Among the formidable American marques, stood numerous European marques as well, including those sold by the iconic Foreign Motors Inc., located a short distance from automobile row.

Join Brookline Historical Society president Ken Liss for an exploration of the history of Automobile Row and the remnants left behind, many of them hidden in plain sight.

Ken Liss has been president of the Brookline Historical Society since 2009. He is a retired librarian who worked more recently at Boston University where the Charles River Campus encompasses many of the former Auto Row buildings.

The registration fee is a donation to the Museum of $10. • The fee is 100% tax deductible.

Please make sure to sign up for this event to receive the Zoom link!

Every dollar received for these presentations helps to defray the cost of providing outstanding community programming. Please support the Larz Anderson Auto Museum as we continue to fulfill our mission to serve and educate.

 
 

Exploring twentieth-century car advertising, this talk considers the primary themes that advertisers hoped would appeal to women. Throughout, car manufacturers & advertisers asserted that women’s car buying was unique and gendered. With remarkable consistency, advertisers implored women to buy cars for different reasons than men, and only occasionally promised handbags that matched the upholstery or matching lipstick.

Katherine Parkin is Professor of History and the Jules Plangere Jr. Chair in American Social History at Monmouth University in New Jersey (US). She is the author of Women at the Wheel: A Century of Buying, Driving, and Fixing Cars(University of Pennsylvania Press, 2017) and Food is Love: Food Advertising and Gender Roles in Modern America(University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005), each of which won the Emily Toth Award for best book in women’s studies and popular culture. She is also the author of more than a dozen articles and book chapters. Her teaching and research interests include the history of women and gender, sexuality, and advertising and consumerism. She has been interviewed by the Economist, the New York Times, the Washington Post, WICN’s Mark Lynch in Worcester, NPR’s Bob Edwards on Sirius-XM, and WHYY’s Marty Moss-Coane in Philadelphia.

There will be a select number of copies of Women at the Wheel: A Century of Buying, Driving, and Fixing Cars available for purchase directly through the Museum for $10. Pick up only. Contact education@larzanderson.org for details.

The registration fee is a donation to the Museum of $10 • The fee is 100% tax deductible.

Please make sure to sign up for this event to receive the Zoom link!

*Please re-register even if you had previously signed up for the March 2020 event.

Every dollar received for these presentations helps to defray the cost of providing outstanding community programming. Please support the Larz Anderson Auto Museum as we continue to fulfill our mission to serve and educate.

 
NOV11

THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF DIE CAST

The Wonderful World of Die Cast: An Insider’s Perspective
with Rick Hanmore
Thursday, November 11, 2021
Doors open at 6:30 PM | In-Person Presentation Starts at 7:00pm
 

Since the dawn of the automobile age, die cast models have stolen the hearts of millions of people of all ages from across the world. From Matchbox to Danbury Mint and every brand in between, almost every automobile enthusiastic has inevitably owned a die cast model. But do you know how they are made? Come and meet Rick Hanmore, a former Development Associate at Danbury Mint, and learn what goes into creating one of these detailed works of art. From photographing and measuring vehicles, to replicating every aspect of the vehicles in scale, the development process of creating a die cast replica from conception to final production was no small feat! For Rick, the variety of cars that he worked on and the amazing collections of car that he was able to see, made this the perfect job for a “car guy.”

If you are interested in automobiles, die cast models, or automobilia in general, this talk is for you!

A small collection of Rick’s die cast cars are currently on display at the Larz Anderson Auto Museum. One of the last models he ever worked on, the Sam Hollingsworth’s Nomad which unfortunately never made it to production, is also on display in the museum, accompanied by its larger and more drivable inspiration.

The registration fee is a donation to the Museum of $10 • The fee is 100% tax deductible.

Every dollar received for these presentations helps to defray the cost of providing outstanding community programming. Please support the Larz Anderson Auto Museum as we continue to fulfill our mission to serve and educate.

*This presentation is scheduled to occur in-person at the Larz Anderson Auto Museum. Brookline is under a strict mask mandate and masks must be worn inside the museum. If restrictions change, the presentation will be moved to Zoom.

 
nov17

THANKSGIVING TRADITIONS IN BOSTON

With Anthony Sammarco
Wednesday, November 17, 2021
Doors open at 6:30 PM | In-Person Presentation Starts at 7:00pm
 

Noah Webster described Thanksgiving as "The act of rendering thanks or expressing gratitude for favors or mercies," and it has been celebrated nationally on and off since 1789. Governors of Massachusetts would proclaim a local holiday of Thanksgiving, but it was Sarah J. Hale, the editor of Godey's Lady's Book, who promoted a national day of Thanksgiving. It was during the Civil War under the presidency of Abraham Lincoln that Thanksgiving became a federal holiday in 1863.

By the late nineteenth century in Boston--now a thriving nexus of ethnic, religious, and racially diverse residents, and far more diverse than the early Pilgrims could ever have expected--Thanksgiving began to include ethnic foods and traditions which their ancestors brought to the New World. Each group broadened the meaning of Thanksgiving and food became a way of preserving one's background while assimilating into the "Pilgrim culture."

Though Thanksgiving today often is celebrated with food, football, and parades, it replicates the first thanksgiving held by the Pilgrims in 1621. In Boston, there was the annual Thanksgiving Day parade, held from 1929 to 1943. Thanksgiving Traditions in Boston is a compilation of more of Boston's shared traditions and anecdotes, both traditional and created.

Referred to as the “Balzac of Boston History” by the Boston Globe, Anthony Mitchell Sammarco is a noted historian and author of over seventy books on the history and development of Boston, and he lectures widely on the history and development of his native city. He commenced writing in 1995, and his books Lost Boston, The History of Howard Johnson’s: How A Massachusetts Soda Fountain Became a Roadside Icon, Jordan Marsh: New England’s Largest Store and The Baker Chocolate Company: A Sweet History have made the bestsellers list.

Mr. Sammarco teaches the popular course Boston History at the Boston University Metropolitan College. He has taught at The Urban College of Boston since 1997, where his courses led to him being named Educator of the Year. He has received the Bulfinch Award from the Doric Dames of the Massachusetts State House and the Washington Medal from Freedom Foundation and a lifetime achievement from the Victorian Society and the Gibson House Museum and was named Dorchester town historian by Raymond L. Flynn, mayor of Boston, for his work in history. He was elected a Fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society, is a member of the Boston Author's Club, a proprietor of the Boston Athenaeum and the St. Botolph Club in Boston.

He is past president of the Bay State Historical League and served as a corporator of the New England Baptist Hospital for a decade. He lives in Boston and in Osterville on Cape Cod.

The registration fee is a donation to the Museum of $10 • The fee is 100% tax deductible.

Every dollar received for these presentations helps to defray the cost of providing outstanding community programming. Please support the Larz Anderson Auto Museum as we continue to fulfill our mission to serve and educate.

*This presentation is scheduled to occur in-person at the Larz Anderson Auto Museum. Brookline is under a strict mask mandate and masks must be worn inside the museum. If restrictions change, the presentation will be moved to Zoom.